Dear Prospective Board Member,

Let me start by expressing gratitude for your consideration of serving on the Board. It is with commitments like yours that brings the responsibility of promoting a worthwhile cause to the communities

Please take a few minutes to complete the enclosed board member application and then return it to us either by email. Once we receive your completed application,  a representative will be in contact with you in the next few weeks.

Again, thank you for considering a role in our organization and the work we do for the children. If you have any questions, please contact me at either 8047095324 or moses@childreninitiative.org

Thank you for your time,

Jongole Kikwiyakare

President

The Board of Directors’ 10 Basic Roles and Responsibilities

1. Establishing the organization’s mission and purpose

The Board is responsible for determining the mission of the organization. Every Board members gets it direction from the organization mission and vision. The vision is what the organization wants to see happen. The mission is the action plan to accomplish the vision. Board members decide if the programs and services are pertinent to the mission. They also help create new programs and services that accomplish the mission and help raise the funds to keep your dreams alive. The mission can always change over time.

2. Select the Executive Director

The Board of Directors is responsible for hiring and overseeing the Executive Director. Initially, the Executive Director role is filled by the Founder who is the CEO/President. Later, the Board may need to recruit and hire an Executive Director and decide on a pay scale.  Either way, the Board has one employee to oversee: the Executive Director. The Executive Director is responsible for managing staff and volunteers and running day-to-day operations. Ideally, the Board and Executive Director, CEO/president will work together as partners to lead the nonprofit, especially on the strategic plan, fundraising, and overall evaluation of the organization.

3. Provide Proper Financial Oversight

The Board provide financial oversight for the organization. The Board is responsible for monitoring how closely financial activity matches the actual budget, looking into how much programs and services cost, and whether that cost is appropriate. They put internal controls in place and help write policies to prevent loss, theft, or confusion, using current best practice.  The Board inspect your balance sheet and income statement regularly, preferably monthly, and they are responsible for making sure the organization meet its legal and tax obligations and have collective responsibility for fiscal expenditures to the donor

 

4. Ensure Adequate Resources

Board members should be able to help raise money to ensure the organization has the resources it needs to succeed.  All Board members should be involved in fundraising in some capacity during the year,

 All Board members must put expectations in writing to make it clear he or she consider “participation in fundraising.” Board members should leverage their professional and social relationships to bring new supporters to the organization. People they know could be a potential donor. The Board should also make personal financial contributions to the organization that they serve on the Board of. Having 100% Board giving is important for getting grants and also lets donors know that the entire Board is fully behind the organization.

 

5. Ensure Legal and Ethical Integrity and Maintain Accountability

The Board is responsible for making sure that the organization operates with the laws that govern it at the local, state, national and international level,  things like submitting annual corporate paperwork to the state, submitting revenue/tax information to appropriate agencies (in the US it’s the IRS), and renewing solicitation permits. Every Board member should be familiar with the organization’s bylaws and adhere to them. The Board makes sure the organization has a system for keeping accurate records in case they are requested by government agencies or donors. The Board should help create and maintain a code of ethics for the organization.

6. Ensure Effective Organizational Planning

The Board is responsible for both short-term and long-term strategic planning. In conjunction with key staff and volunteers, the Board makes realistic plans that take into account the organization’s vision, the community’s needs, and the external context in which the organization operates. The Board should also get involved in planning for accountability and evaluation of the strategic plan once it’s implemented. This means reviewing the cost of operating programs, appropriate levels of cost, and whether programs or services should be initiated or discontinued.

 

7. Recruit and Orient New Board Members and Assess Board Performance

The Board is responsible for recruiting new board members in partnership with your CEO/President.

Through their networking opportunities, board members should be on the lookout for potential new board members who would bring additional knowledge, talent, experiences, or perspective to the board to take the organization to the next level. They should educate and inform prospective board members about the work of the board and invite them to board meetings and other organizational activities. Board members should suggest possible candidates to the board as openings arise. The Board also do periodical self assessment to evaluage their performance and identify area of improvement

 

8. Enhance the Organization’s Public Standing

Board members should always be prepared to speak well of the organization and advocate for its services. They are a bridge between the organization and the community, the media, and government entities. Because they donate their time, people in the community tend to respect the fact that they are part of something they really believe in. Each Board member should remember that they may be the only ambassador of your organization that some people meet. The Board should work to create the public brand of the organization as well. Together with the CEO/President, they should decide who the public spokesperson is, what they should say, and how they should interface with the media.

9. Determine, Monitor, and Strengthen the Organization’s Programs and Services

Board members should have detailed knowledge of who participates in or takes advantage of your major programs and services. They should watch for participation trends in the numbers and categories of people served. The Board will be helping to decide what portion of the annual budget is devoted to programs and services, so it’s important to know what’s working, what’s not working, and what needs to be improved on. The Board works with the CEO to develop a way to measure the success of the programs and participants’ satisfaction with their experience in your programs.

 

10. Support the CEO and Assess His/Her Performance

The Board is responsible for providing an annual performance evaluation for the Executive Director. The Board should create a clear process for conducting this evaluation and identify specific Board members to carry out the evaluation on behalf of the entire Board. Everyone should be very clear about when and how evaluations should take place, preferably done at the same time each year.

Board meeting schedule

The board  meets six times throughout the year, which is approximately every other month or when an emergency meeting of the Board is called via zoom or physical meeting.

Board Dues

Board members are required to pay board dues which are $100.00 per year upon appointment and receipt of an official letter of determination

Personal Ethics every Board member must have.

1. Ability to listen, analyze, think clearly and creatively, and work well with people individually and in a group.

2. Willingness to prepare for and attend board and committee meetings, ask questions, take responsibility and follow through on a given assignment, contribute personal and financial resources in a generous way according to circumstances, open doors in the community, advocate for the organization, and evaluate oneself.

3. Interest in developing certain skills that you may not possess, such as in cultivating and soliciting funds, cultivating and recruiting board members and other volunteers, reading and understanding financial statements, and learning more about the substantive program area of the organization.

4. Possession of honesty, sensitivity to and tolerance of differing views, community-building skills, personal integrity and sense of values, and concern for your nonprofit’s development.

Personal Ethics every Board member must have.

1. Ability to listen, analyze, think clearly and creatively, and work well with people individually and in a group.

2. Willingness to prepare for and attend board and committee meetings, ask questions, take responsibility and follow through on a given assignment, contribute personal and financial resources in a generous way according to circumstances, open doors in the community, advocate for the organization, and evaluate oneself.

3. Interest in developing certain skills that you may not possess, such as in cultivating and soliciting funds, cultivating and recruiting board members and other volunteers, reading and understanding financial statements, and learning more about the substantive program area of the organization.

4. Possession of honesty, sensitivity to and tolerance of differing views, community-building skills, personal integrity and sense of values, and concern for your nonprofit’s development.